Impact of environmental pollution on carboxyhemoglobin levels among smoking and non-smoking motorcycle taxi drivers

  • Luiz Almeida Silva Universidade Federal de Goiás
  • Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz Robazzi Universidade de São Paulo
  • Hildeu Ferreira Assunção Universidade Federal de Goiás
  • Rita de Cassia de Marchi Barcelos Dalri Universidade de São Paulo
  • Ludmila Grego Maia Universidade Federal de Goiás
  • Sebastião Elias da Silveira Universidade de São Paulo
  • Guilherme Silva Mendonça Universidade Federal de Uberlândia
  • Marcelo Fouad Rabahi Universidade Federal de Goiás
  • Celmo Celeno Porto Universidade Federal de Goiás
Keywords: Environmental pollution, Smoking habit, Occupational Health, Carboxyhemoglobin.

Abstract

Studies related to environmental pollution, carbon monoxide levels and smoking need to be deepened, especially in the case of traffic workers. Therefore, the objective was to verify the association between environmental carbon monoxide and carboxyhemoglobin levels among smoking and non-smoking motorcycle taxi drivers. A longitudinal epidemiological study was carried out with 95 motorcycle taxi drivers with measurement of the environmental carbon monoxide, carboxyhemoglobin in the exhaled air in three moments with interval of six months, between June 2014 and March 2015, as well as sociodemographic and occupational characteristics of these workers. The seasons of the year presented different carbon monoxide averages (p <0.05), with higher levels in the spring and lower in the autumn, while carboxyhemoglobin levels among smokers and non-smokers were high in the winter, fair in the spring and low in the autumn. Statistical differences were observed between subgroups: between autumn and spring for non-smokers (p = 0.024) and between winter and autumn for smokers (p = 0.042). There was a positive correlation between carbon monoxide and carboxyhemoglobin levels for non-smokers (rs = 0.9983; p < 0.01). Environmental pollution represented different levels in the four seasons of the year and significant association with carboxyhemoglobin levels.Thecarboxyhemoglobin levels were higher among smokers, with statistical significance between winter and fall seasons, while non-smokers presented normal levels, whatconfirms the direct influence of tobacco in carboxyhemoglobin levels.

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Author Biographies

Luiz Almeida Silva, Universidade Federal de Goiás
Health Sciences Academic Unit. Federal University of Goiás. Jataí, Goiás, Brazil.
Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz Robazzi, Universidade de São Paulo
Fundamental Nursing Department of  Ribeirao Preto Nursing School, University of São Paulo. Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
Hildeu Ferreira Assunção, Universidade Federal de Goiás
Department of Agricultural Sciences. Federal University of Goiás. Jataí, Goiás, Brazil
Rita de Cassia de Marchi Barcelos Dalri, Universidade de São Paulo
Department of Fundamental Nursing,  Ribeirao Preto Nursing School, University of São Paulo. Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
Ludmila Grego Maia, Universidade Federal de Goiás
Health Sciences Academic Unit. Federal University of Goiás. Jataí, Goiás, Brazil
Sebastião Elias da Silveira, Universidade de São Paulo
Fundamental Nursing Department of  Ribeirao Preto Nursing School, University of São Paulo. Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil
Guilherme Silva Mendonça, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia
Nurse, Pedagogue, Master in Health Sciences. Federal University of Uberlândia
Marcelo Fouad Rabahi, Universidade Federal de Goiás
Faculty of Medicine. Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil
Celmo Celeno Porto, Universidade Federal de Goiás
Faculty of Medicine. Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil
Published
2018-03-26
How to Cite
Silva, L. A., Robazzi, M. L. do C. C., Assunção, H. F., Dalri, R. de C. de M. B., Maia, L. G., Silveira, S. E. da, Mendonça, G. S., Rabahi, M. F., & Porto, C. C. (2018). Impact of environmental pollution on carboxyhemoglobin levels among smoking and non-smoking motorcycle taxi drivers . Bioscience Journal, 34(2). https://doi.org/10.14393/BJ-v34n2a2018-39431
Section
Health Sciences